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Article
June 1936

IS OCULAR PROPRIOCEPTIVE SENSE CONCERNED IN VISION?

Author Affiliations

BOSTON
From the Howe Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Harvard University, and the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1936;15(6):1037-1049. doi:10.1001/archopht.1936.00840180081008
Abstract

In recent years, importance has been attributed to the part played by the proprioceptive sense of the extra-ocular muscles in orienting and modifying certain visual perceptions such as projection, stereopsis and the interpretation of motion on the retina. Disturbance of the proprioceptive sense has been cited as an etiologic factor in various motor anomalies, as nystagmus1 and certain squints.2 The work of Sherrington2 has been accepted and interpreted as proof of proprioceptive sense in extra-ocular muscles by Duane,3 Duke-Elder,4 Adler5 and Byrne6 in their textbooks and by Karrer and Stevens7 and McLean8 in recent articles. In contemporary English literature on the extrinsic muscles of the eye this point of view seems prevalent, overshadowing that of such old authorities as Helmholtz,9 Tscherning10 and Hering,11 who attributed no importance to the proprioceptive sense of the eye muscles in

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