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Article
August 1936

PHOSPHOLIPID CONTENT OF CATARACTOUS AND SCLEROSED HUMAN LENSES: A BIOCHEMICAL STUDY OF LENTICULAR CHANGES

Author Affiliations

IOWA CITY
From the Department of Ophthalmology, State University of Iowa College of Medicine.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1936;16(2):271-283. doi:10.1001/archopht.1936.00840200109012
Abstract

In a previous publication1 it was shown that there is a decrease in the phospholipid content of cataractous lenses, especially in the advanced stages of maturity. Since this is at variance with the older conception, according to which all lipids are supposed to show an increased amount in cataractous lenses, it was considered necessary to repeat the work. At the same time the phospholipid content was studied with respect to sclerosis of the lens.

The word sclerosis in this treatise is used in a more restricted sense than that commonly understood by oculists. It is customary among ophthalmologists to designate by this term simply the general process of hardening of the nucleus incident to growth, aging or pathologic changes, i.e., irrespective of the nature of the agencies involved in this process. It is a generally accepted fact that the nucleus of the lens is the result of a continuous

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