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Article
September 1936

USE OF VASODILATORS IN TREATMENT OF RETROBULBAR NEURITIS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Herman Knapp Memorial Eye Hospital.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1936;16(3):380-399. doi:10.1001/archopht.1936.00840210052002
Abstract

As the intravenous administration of a 10 per cent solution of sodium nitrite was successful in bringing about a rapid return of vision in cases of tobacco amblyopia,1 it seemed logical to discover whether or not a similar beneficial result would follow its use in cases of other types of retrobulbar neuritis.

The theory that tobacco amblyopia might be of vascular origin was developed from earlier work of Sourdille, Schieck, Aubaret and Sedan, Horniker, Imre and others by Pflimlin in 1930. The results following the use of sodium nitrite in the treatment of tobacco amblyopia which were obtained by Pflimlin and other workers (Duggan, Laszlo, Shannon and McAndrews and Cordes and Harrington) have been given at length in the aforementioned reference, together with a description of the composition of the preparation used.

In the nine cases of retrobulbar neuritis described in this paper sodium nitrite was used intravenously.

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