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Article
September 1936

FIBROSARCOMA OF EYELIDREPORT OF A CASE

Arch Ophthalmol. 1936;16(3):472-475. doi:10.1001/archopht.1936.00840210146013
Abstract

Various textbooks of pathology1 state that a spindle cell sarcoma may originate in almost any situation in which there is connective tissue, such as the subcutaneous and submucous tissues, fasciae, muscles, periosteum and framework of organs. Fuchs2 mentioned fibroma as among the very rare tumors of the lids. Therefore, it is thought that this case might prove of interest for two reasons: first, because of the unique location of the tumor and, second, because in the early stages the growth simulated chronic conjunctivitis and blepharitis.

REPORT OF CASE

History.—B. D., a boy aged 9 years, was admitted to the Hospital for Sick Children, with the complaint that three months before admission his right lower lid began to swell and redden. There had been no previous injury or inflammation. The family physician treated the condition as conjunctivitis, and when no improvement was noted he scraped some

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