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Article
November 1936

COMPARATIVE ANATOMY OF THE EYE

Arch Ophthalmol. 1936;16(5):783-803. doi:10.1001/archopht.1936.00840230063005
Abstract

I. THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE ANTERIOR SEGMENT AND ITS SIGNIFICANCE FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE VERTEBRATE EYE AS A WHOLE

The result of an embryologic study of the development of the anterior segment of the eye1 proved to be of special interest for the evolution of the eye as a whole and gave rise to the conceptions presented in this paper.

The development of the anterior segment of the eye is generally described as follows (fig. 1): The optic vesicle, developing from the neural tube, becomes invaginated. The primordium of the lens, lying in the surface ectoderm, also becomes invaginated ; this lens pit deepens, and finally the lens vesicle is separated from the surface ectoderm by mesoderm. In this mesoderm a cleft appears, which is the anterior chamber of the eye.

The process traced was essentially different (figs. 2 and 3): In Torpedo (fish), as soon as

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