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Article
December 1936

STUDIES IN HISTOCHEMISTRY: X. DISTRIBUTION OF VITAMIN C IN THE LENS OF THE EYE

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO
From the Pathological and Research Laboratories of the Mount Zion Hospital, San Francisco.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1936;16(6):990-995. doi:10.1001/archopht.1936.00840240090009
Abstract

The lens of the eye, having no blood supply, is especially dependent on those intracellular substances which form oxidation-reduction systems for the maintenance of many of its metabolic processes. In this connection, a great deal of work has been published recently on the occurrence and rôle of vitamin C in the lens.

The concentration of vitamin C in the lens as reported for a number of animals is shown in table 1.

Apparently no significance can be attached to the concentration of vitamin C in the lens in regard to the capacity of some animals, such as the rat, rabbit, sheep, ox, cow and horse, for synthesizing this vitamin and the lack of this capacity in animals such as the guinea-pig and man, who must obtain vitamin C from their food. The variation in the concentration of vitamin C between these two groups is less than the variation within

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