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Article
December 1936

BIOCHEMISTRY OF THE LENS: X. PREPARATION OF GLUTATHIONE FROM THE CRYSTALLINE LENS

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Departments of Ophthalmology and Physiological Chemistry, Northwestern University.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1936;16(6):1001-1003. doi:10.1001/archopht.1936.00840240101011
Abstract

The energy arising in the animal body is mainly the result of oxidative processes. Oxidation in the tissues is carried by two mechanisms: the addition of oxygen to a substance and the withdrawal of hydrogen from it. According to Duke-Elder,1 the oxidative activity of crystalline lens is greater than that of nerve but less than that of muscle, while the oxygen tension in the aqueous is insufficient to meet the needs of the lens. According to Goldschmidt,2 the lens is dependent largely on the second method of oxidation (the removal of hydrogen from the lens).

This mechanism depends on the presence of a substance that can act as a hydrogen acceptor. There are at least two such substances present in the lens (glutathione and vitamin C). The facts that glutathione is in greater concentration in this tissue than in any other and that this substance is

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