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Article
December 1936

ACTION OF EPINEPHRINE ON THE DISEASED HUMAN EYE: USE OF THE STRONGER SOLUTIONS FOR INSTILLATION

Author Affiliations

ATLANTA, GA.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1936;16(6):1018-1027. doi:10.1001/archopht.1936.00840240118014
Abstract

The value of epinephrine in the treatment of certain types of glaucoma is now well established. That complications may arise from its use is equally well known, and this knowledge creates the necessity of realizing the possibility of such ill effects and understanding them when they occur. Wessely1 and Darier2 were probably the first to demonstrate that the drug lowers intra-ocular pressure. These observations were corroborated both in the laboratory and in the clinic by other investigators.3 Hamburger4 has been the most ardent proponent of this form of therapy. It is due chiefly to his tireless efforts and extensive research that the method has become a recognized therapeutic procedure.

When first employed, epinephrine was injected subconjunctivally, usually in doses ranging from 0.3 to 0.5 cc. of a 1: 1,000 solution. When it is realized that such doses represent a relatively large amount of active

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