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Article
January 1937

TRACHOMATOUS KERATITIS: A BIOMICROSCOPIC STUDY OF TWO HUNDRED AND EIGHTY INDIAN SCHOOL CHILDREN

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Department of Ophthalmology, College of Medicine, State University of Iowa.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1937;17(1):18-26. doi:10.1001/archopht.1937.00850010030002
Abstract

Prior to the advent of the biomicroscope the pannus of trachoma was generally believed to be a frequent but not invariable complication of the disease, occurring usually months or years after the onset. The slit lamp studies of Dusseldorp,1 Danilevskij,2 Wilson,3 Cuénod and Nataf,4 Gallemaerts,5 Busacca,6 Horváth,7 Morax,8 Morax and Petit,9 Howard10 and others have indicated that pannus is not a complication of trachoma but an integral part of the disease, appearing in its earliest stages. Of particular interest have been the reports of Cuénod and Nataf from Tunis, Wilson from Egypt, and Busacca from Brazil.

Cuénod and Nataf found biomicroscopic signs of pannus in children with pure trachoma at a time when gross examination revealed no changes. Wilson, considering only the vascular changes of pannus, found extension of capillary loops into the cornea invariably in Egyptian trachoma. In

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