[Skip to Navigation]
Article
January 1937

METASTATIC PNEUMOCOCCIC UVEOSCLERITIS FOLLOWING PNEUMONIA

Author Affiliations

LONG ISLAND CITY, N. Y.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1937;17(1):127-134. doi:10.1001/archopht.1937.00850010139010
Abstract

Metastatic infections of the inner ocular structures are not rare. The septic embolus is usually carried into the eye either through the retinal or through the uveal system of blood vessels. Experiments of Selenkowsky and Woizechowsky1 demonstrated that the embolus usually lodges in the posterior segment of the eye, i. e., in the retina (if carried by the central retinal artery) or in the choroid (if carried by one of the short posterior ciliary arteries).

Infections of the anterior segment of the eye, i. e., of the iris and ciliary body, are usually supposed to be transmitted by the long posterior ciliary arteries. These arteries enter the interior of the eye near the posterior pole and run, one on the nasal side, the other, on the temporal side, of the eyeball, between the choroid and the sclera, as far as the ciliary muscle. At the root of the

Add or change institution
×