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Article
February 1937

SHORT STUDIES ON THE HISTORY OF OPHTHALMOLOGY: III. HUGHLINGS JACKSON, THE NEUROLOGIC OPHTHALMOLOGIST, WITH A SUMMARY OF HIS WORKS

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

Arch Ophthalmol. 1937;17(2):241-289. doi:10.1001/archopht.1937.00850020047006
Abstract

When informed by a distinguished scientist that much of his success was due to the fact that he had not been overeducated and that he was glad he had not been sent to a university, one's interest is immediately aroused, and one is inclined to wonder as to how he had become "educated" and to inquire into the facts of his life. It was John Hughlings Jackson who made these statements, a man so brilliant in his varied contributions to medicine that Sir Jonathan Hutchinson spoke of him as his greatest discovery, the nearest to a genius that it was his privilege to know. So wide were Jackson's medical activities, which included physiology, psychology and pathology, that he undertook the special study of ophthalmology solely that it might help him in his study of the diseases of the nervous system, the branch of practice in which he became

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