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Article
April 1937

ACETYLCHOLINE IN THE TREATMENT OF ACUTE RETROBULBAR NEURITIS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Herman Knapp Memorial Eye Hospital.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1937;17(4):579-585. doi:10.1001/archopht.1937.00850040013001
Abstract

Owing to the fact that sodium nitrite administered intravenously and amyl nitrite given by inhalation have both been found to be very effective in aborting attacks of acute retrobulbar neuritis,1 with resulting rapid improvement in vision, it was deemed advisable to study the action of acetylcholine, a powerful but little used vasodilator, in this interesting disease.

In 1931 de Saint-Martin2 reported a case of retrobulbar neuritis in which he thought the condition was improved after the use of acetylcholine. A woman of 31 had noticed gradual failure in vision, which began six weeks after the birth of a child. Five months later vision was found to be 6/10 in the right eye and perception of light in the left eye. The visual fields were contracted, and there was probably a central scotoma in each eye. The fundi were normal. A submucous resection of the nasal septum was

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