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Article
April 1937

SPASM OF THE CENTRAL RETINAL ARTERY IN RAYNAUD'S DISEASEREPORT OF A CASE

Arch Ophthalmol. 1937;17(4):662-665. doi:10.1001/archopht.1937.00850040096004
Abstract

In reviewing the literature on Raynaud's disease, it is found that ocular complications occur infrequently and spasm of the central artery of the retina is exceedingly rare. In fact, Raynaud's disease itself is not common.

Raynaud's disease was first described as a distinct malady in 1862 by Maurice Raynaud.1 In describing Raynaud's disease, DaCosta2 said that it is usually regarded as a vasomotor neurosis, and is seen most frequently in children and young women but sometimes in men. The etiology is not known. Cecil and Kennedy3 said that the disease passes through three stages: local syncope, local asphyxia and local gangrene. Local syncope is characterized by vasoconstriction of the affected parts which makes them pale and cold. The fingers and toes are the parts usually involved, but the disease may affect the ears, nose, lips, chin and nates. There is a feeling of deadness, usually accompanied by

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