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Article
April 1937

THE GLAUCOMA CLINIC OF THE HERMAN KNAPP MEMORIAL EYE HOSPITAL

Arch Ophthalmol. 1937;17(4):666-673. doi:10.1001/archopht.1937.00850040100005
Abstract

For many years ophthalmologists have realized that progress toward the solution of the problem of glaucoma has been so dishearteningly slow that something more definite must be achieved in regard to this question.

The symposium on glaucoma at the Thirteenth International Congress of Ophthalmology, held in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, in 1929, did nothing to improve the situation. Duke-Elder, Magitot, Wessely and von Haagen, who reviewed the subject, confessed that the mystery was as profound as ever.

Having studied the problem for many years, our colleagues and we felt that the prevailing theories were leading nowhere. Gradually one of us developed a theory of his own as to the nature of glaucoma, differing in many respects from prevailing theories. We felt, also, that no progress would be made except by means of a carefully thought out plan of action not only involving theoretical considerations and laboratory investigations but combining

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