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Article
July 1937

SECONDARY CATARACT: WITH PARTICULAR REFERENCE TO TRANSPARENT GLOBULAR BODIES

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA
From the Department of Ophthalmology, University of Pennsylvania, and the Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Wills Hospital.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1937;18(1):12-22. doi:10.1001/archopht.1937.00850070024002
Abstract

Transparent globular bodies frequently constitute an interesting feature of after-cataract. A few of the many bodies of this nature observed by us, as seen with the slit lamp and the corneal microscope, are illustrated in figures 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6.

Little has been written about this peculiar and frequently occurring phenomenon, although J. Hirschberg1 remarked on "drops" which not only form a part of various cataracts but are found in after-cataract membranes. Elschnig2 described them exactly and made microscopic examinations. He failed to mention Hirschberg.

Koby3 stated that transparent globules are found more frequently in the young than in the old and that he rarely met with globular cells after the fiftieth year. This has not been our experience. There seems to be no preference in regard to age. Of the four cases of after-cataract with formation of globules described by Vogt,4

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