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Article
July 1937

A CASE OF OPACITIES OF THE VITREOUS OBSERVED FOR TWENTY YEARS AFTER SCLEROCORNEAL TREPHINING

Author Affiliations

Portland, Ore.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1937;18(1):103-104. doi:10.1001/archopht.1937.00850070115015

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Abstract

On Nov. 2, 1916, the vision of the left eye of a 28 year old farmer was reduced to perception of light by a hemorrhage into the vitreous. On November 4 a complete survey, including a serologic study of the spinal fluid, gave negative results, but the teeth and tonsils were finally removed as suspicious. The vision of the left eye was limited strictly to perception of light for six months, after which time perception of light was lost permanently because of organization of the hemorrhage, and there was total detachment of the retina.

On March 4, 1917, a massive intravitreous hemorrhage in the "normal" right eye reduced the vision in this eye from 20/20 to perception of light. On June 18 a complete survey, including tests for sensitivity to tuberculin, carried out at the Mayo Clinic, gave negative results.

On August 7 the patient was seen by

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