[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
September 1937

A RARE COMPLICATION FOLLOWING APPENDECTOMY: REPORT OF A CASE IN A FIFTY-FOUR YEAR OLD MAN

Author Affiliations

DRAMMEN, NORWAY

Arch Ophthalmol. 1937;18(3):371-372. doi:10.1001/archopht.1937.00850090039005
Abstract

It is probable that small cerebral hemorrhages, causing no symptoms, occur not infrequently during general anesthesia. Thus, patients often state that they have noticed some degree of deafness subsequent to being given a general anesthetic. If these statements are correct it must be supposed that hemorrhage in the inner ear has occurred. Cases of cerebral apoplexy such as the one here reported are rare.

REPORT OF CASE

K. T., a 54 year old carpenter, was brought to the hospital in Drammen on March 21, 1937. The past history contained nothing of significance apart from a chronic ailment of the nose and ear. The patient had undergone an operation for a deviated nasal septum on February 18. At that time his blood pressure had measured 150 systolic and 110 diastolic. During the night prior to his admission to the hospital he had been seized with abdominal pain. The diagnosis of

×