[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
September 1937

ABNORMAL OCULAR AND PUPILLARY MOVEMENTS FOLLOWING OCULOMOTOR PARALYSIS: REPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

NEW HAVEN, CONN.; NEW YORK
From the dispensary of Lincoln Hospital, New York, and the Laboratory of Physiology, Yale University.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1937;18(3):411-414. doi:10.1001/archopht.1937.00850090079009
Abstract

On recovering from palsy of the oculomotor nerve, the formerly paralyzed ocular muscles may make movements which are contrary to or incoordinate with normal associated motions of the globes and eyelids. For example, in looking down, the upper eyelid, which normally follows the globe in its vertical movements, may not descend. Indeed, the eyelid may even retract upward when the globe moves downward. Another atypical ocular movement abnormally associated with downward gaze is inward rotation of the globe. A third and more rare type of abnormal movement associated with looking down is constriction of a pupil which at rest is dilated and inactive to light or in accommodation. In the following case report all three types of abnormal movements occurring simultaneously in one eye are described.

REPORT OF CASE

J. D., a man aged 28, applied to the dispensary of the Lincoln Hospital for treatment of a contused lip. On

×