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Article
September 1937

A CASE OF LYMPHOCYTIC MENINGITIS (?) WITH OCULAR FINDINGS

Arch Ophthalmol. 1937;18(3):428-430. doi:10.1001/archopht.1937.00850090096011

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Abstract

Benign lymphocytic meningitis seems to be on the increase. The disease is peculiar in that it is characterized by a severity of symptoms that is surprising, in view of the fact that recovery is prompt and complete. The condition occurs chiefly in younger persons.

REPORT OF CASE

History.—S. A., an Italian youth aged 15, was referred to me on Aug. 18, 1936. His chief complaint was photophobia. With the exception of scarlet fever a number of years previously, he had always enjoyed good health. About one week prior to my seeing him he began to complain of extreme photophobia. This was accompanied by headaches, with no particular localization. These symptoms were constant. Dark glasses did not help. Salicylates helped only a little.

Examination.—At this time a general examination showed nothing of importance. The ocular examination revealed the following:

Vision in each eye was normal. Refraction was carried

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