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Article
October 1937

CORTICAL INNERVATION OF OCULAR MOVEMENTS IN THE HORIZONTAL PLANE

Author Affiliations

AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS

Arch Ophthalmol. 1937;18(4):527-531. doi:10.1001/archopht.1937.00850100039003
Abstract

A physiologist to whom ophthalmologists owe some of the best devised experiments on the mechanism of oculomotion recently expressed his opinion on the cortical innervation of ocular movement. This opinion, as expressed by him in various publications, is essentially in agreement with that of Duval and Laborde, although the latest anatomic researches show such a view to be untenable. Spiegel and Scala,1 while apparently admitting the correctness of the latest data, viz., that the nucleus commissurae posterioris plays an important part in the mechanism of horizontal ocular movement, as does also a lateral nucleus in the globus pallidus as a tertiary center, stated: "There still exists much uncertainty concerning the cortical innervation of the ocular muscles." There seems to me to be some discrepancy in the reasoning of Spiegel and Scala, for, while admitting the uncertainty of the cortical innervation of the ocular muscles, they nevertheless have

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