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Article
October 1937

FORMATION OF PRERETINAL CONNECTIVE TISSUE IN THE VITREOUS IN ACUTE CHOROIDITIS: REPORT OF THREE CASES

Arch Ophthalmol. 1937;18(4):558-560. doi:10.1001/archopht.1937.00850100070007
Abstract

The opacities of the vitreous which accompany acute exudative choroiditis usually become absorbed in the course of time and do not interfere with vision unless the choroidal focus invades the macular region. Sometimes a band of opacity remains which extends from the nerve head to the area of choroidal atrophy. Another and more unusual permanent change is the opacity of the vitreous which is the subject of this communication. The vitreous is clear except for this opacity, which is situated just in front of the retina and seems to have a predilection for the macular region. The opacity adheres to the retina and is irregularly branching, whitish, and of varying thickness in the center, fading out at the periphery. Stationary, it seems anchored to the internal membrane of the retina. It always covers the retinal blood vessels, and new-formed capillaries are never observed to penetrate the opacity. In this

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