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Article
December 1937

EFFECTS OF DINITROPHENOL ON THE PERMEABILITY OF THE CAPSULE OF THE LENS

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO
From the Division of Ophthalmology of the Department of Surgery, and the Department of Pharmacology, Stanford University School of Medicine.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1937;18(6):908-911. doi:10.1001/archopht.1937.00850120042004
Abstract

In connection with clinical reports that cataracts occurred in patients who had previously taken dinitrophenol for reducing weight it became of interest to determine whether this drug could alter the permeability of the capsule of the lens in vitro and in vivo. If it were to be assumed that there is some connection between the use of dinitrophenol and the production of cataract it would be necessary to establish some rational mechanism to account for the phenomenon. One possibility, previously suggested by Krause1 for other types of cataracts, is that dinitrophenol might decrease the permeability of the capsule of the lens and prevent the normal interchange of metabolites. On the other hand, it might increase the permeability so as to allow foreign materials to penetrate into the lens. Such hypotheses have led to fruitful investigations of other types of cataracts, as in the recent study of Gifford and his

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