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Article
January 1938

A SPECIAL FORM OF KERATITIS CAUSED BY FRIEDLÄNDER'S PNEUMOBACILLUS: REPORT OF A CASE, WITH REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

Author Affiliations

PEIPING, CHINA
From the Department of Ophthalmology, the Peiping Union Medical College.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1938;19(1):103-109. doi:10.1001/archopht.1938.00850130115012
Abstract

The pneumobacillus was discovered by C. Friedländer1 in the fibrinous bronchial exudate and in the pulmonary alveolar tissue of patients with pneumonia. This organism is a short, plump bacillus, subject to great variation in size. It measures, on the average, from 0.5 to 1.5 microns in width and from 0.6 to 5 microns in length. It is gram-negative and immotile. It has no flagella or spores but possesses a capsule and grows luxuriantly on blood agar. It belongs to the general group of Bacillus mucosus-capsulatus. Strong2 and Perkins3 made important contributions toward its isolation and differentiation from other species of the same group by means of formation of gas and fermentation of sugar. Fricke4 and Clairmont5 studied thoroughly the distribution of the organism and found that it exists in the nose, mouth, saliva and gastro-intestinal tract of healthy persons, as well as in the various

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