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Article
February 1938

PHYSICAL THERAPY IN OPHTHALMOLOGIC PRACTICE

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Department of Ophthalmology, Northwestern University Medical School.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1938;19(2):171-180. doi:10.1001/archopht.1938.00850140013001
Abstract

I shall consider only a few phases of physical therapy and shall limit my remarks to procedures which have, or seem destined to have, a definite place in ophthalmologic practice.

PHOTOTHERAPY

Phototherapy may be considered briefly, since few recent advances have been made in this field. The indications for general phototherapy are well known, although ophthalmologists are likely to forget them. The object of this form of treatment is to produce repeated mild cutaneous reactions, with a resulting increase in the various bactericidal constituents of the blood and better utilization of calcium and vitamin D by the tissues. Such treatment is nearly always indicated in cases of phlyctenulosis when proper use of sunlight cannot be secured. With the use of a large mercury vapor or carbon arc lamp, one third of the surface of the body is irradiated at a sitting, the dose being chosen which will produce

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