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Article
April 1938

THE DOMINANT EYE: ITS CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE

Author Affiliations

MINNEAPOLIS
From the Department of Ophthalmology, University of Minnesota.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1938;19(4):555-582. doi:10.1001/archopht.1938.00850160081005
Abstract

The role which the dominant eye plays in ocular functions is as yet not fully determined. Although it has been recognized as being present, ophthalmologists have been indifferent as to its importance and the part it plays in maintaining normally coordinating eyes. The dominant eye may be defined as that eye which performs the major function of seeing, being assisted by the less dominant fellow eye. To state it differently, the two eyes do not affect the visual consciousness with equal force. One eye leads the other, and this leading eye is called the dominant eye. Just as the two hands are unequal in response, both from a motor and from a sensory standpoint, so are the eyes. Just as a person may be right handed or left handed, so he may be right eyed or left eyed.

Ocular dominance has not been found mentioned earlier than 1593, in Giovanni

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