[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
September 1938

STUDIES OF THE VISUAL FIELDS IN CASES OF VERIFIED TUMOR OF THE BRAIN

Arch Ophthalmol. 1938;20(3):437-470. doi:10.1001/archopht.1938.00850210093011
Abstract

The value of studies of the visual fields as an aid in the diagnosis of obscure conditions of the eye and brain has long been known. MacKenzie,1 in his textbook on ophthalmology, published in 1854, called attention to the importance of hemianopic defects in the visual fields in the localization of diseases of the brain. About this time the ophthalmoscope made its appearance, and ophthalmology was placed on a firm scientific basis.

The importance of perimetry in the study of lesions that were not visible with the ophthalmoscope immediately became apparent. Troncoso2 stated that von Graefe stressed this fact in 1856. Wilbrand3 in 1881 reported a large number of cases and stressed the importance of examinations of the visual fields as an aid in localizing intracranial disorders. He probably was the first to see the value of using small test objects in bringing out defects that

×