[Skip to Navigation]
Article
October 1938

INDUCED SIZE EFFECT: I. A NEW PHENOMENON IN BINOCULAR SPACE PERCEPTION ASSOCIATED WITH THE RELATIVE SIZES OF THE IMAGES OF THE TWO EYES

Author Affiliations

HANOVER, N. H.
From the Division of Research in Physiological Optics, the Dartmouth Eye Institute of the Dartmouth Medical School.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1938;20(4):604-623. doi:10.1001/archopht.1938.00850220076005
Abstract

Probably one of the most important of the visual clues by which a person can estimate the relative distances and positions of objects in space is stereoscopic localization. These clues arise from the disparities between the two retinal images caused by the slightly different points of view of the two eyes. That stereopsis is the means for the most accurate discrimination of the relative distances of objects is, of course, universally appreciated. It has not been sufficiently recognized, however, that stereoscopic vision also plays an important role in the subjective orientation of all objects in the entire binocular visual field, in the sense of a rotation about the point of fixation. In the absence of strong perspective clues, this particular capacity may provide one of the important visual criteria by which a person can orient himself in the outside world of objects.

Certain experiments which demonstrate a relation

Add or change institution
×