[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 34.204.0.181. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
October 1938

RESULTS OF AUTOTRANSPLANTATION OF CORNEA INTO ANTERIOR CHAMBER: THEIR SIGNIFICANCE REGARDING CORNEAL NUTRITION

Arch Ophthalmol. 1938;20(4):645-650. doi:10.1001/archopht.1938.00850220117008
Abstract

The exact source of nourishment of the cornea and especially of its various layers, the epithelium, the stroma and the "endothelium" (mesenchymal epithelium), is not known. It is generally supposed that the cornea is a relatively inactive tissue with a low metabolism in which the nutritive requirements are not great; that under normal conditions it derives metabolites partly from the pericorneal blood vessels by a process of diffusion and partly from the aqueous humor. A more complete discussion of the subject of corneal nutrition and of the experimental evidence for the existing theories is given in another communication.1 Direct evidence more conclusive than that heretofore produced as to the part played by the aqueous in corneal nutrition has been obtained by transferring a piece of normal cornea from one eye into the anterior chamber of the opposite eye and ascertaining its fate by clinical and histologic

×