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Article
December 1938

EVENTS OF VASCULARIZATION AND DEVASCULARIZATION SEEN IN CORNEAS

Author Affiliations

MILWAUKEE
From the Department of Physiology, Marquette University School of Medicine.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1938;20(6):974-995. doi:10.1001/archopht.1938.00850240088006
Abstract

The Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis Shaw) is the only animal, so far as my observations go, in which the apparently normal cornea becomes extensively invaded by blood vessels. This animal, like others, has the pericorneal network, but at or about the time of birth a number of bouquets of vascular loops (figs. 14 and 15) develop between various corneal lamellae. Each of these bouquets originates from a scleral arteriovenous anastomosis which loops into the cornea (figs. 8 and 9) and then metamorphoses into a principal artery, an accompanying vein, many paired arterial and venous branches and many capillaries which connect the tips of the smallest arteries with the tips of the smallest veins (figs. 14 and 15). The corneal tissue remains extremely clear during the invasion of it by the scleral arteriovenous anastomoses. It is possible, therefore, to observe the metamorphosis of these anastomoses in the

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