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Article
February 1939

EVOLUTION OF A SUCKING DISK FOR INTRACAPSULAR EXTRACTION OF CATARACT

Arch Ophthalmol. 1939;21(2):261-265. doi:10.1001/archopht.1939.00860020065005
Abstract

Ophthalmic surgeons have vied with one another for years in developing a surgical procedure for removal of the cataractous lens in capsule. An operation employing a vacuum has met with some degree of approval.1 It adopts a small cup-shaped protuberance on the distal end of a metal tube which is connected by rubber piping to an adjoining container from which the air has been exhausted. The atmospheric pressure, seeking to balance the vacuum, forces the lens into the cup and provides a grasp sufficiently strong for extraction of the lens from the eye.

The sucking type of instrument is frequently used for the intracapsular extraction of cataract; however, it is not used so often as forceps, yet has advantages over procedures employing forceps, for it will grasp successfully the lacerable as well as the nontearable capsule. The lacerable type of capsule can seldom resist tearing when a forceps is

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