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Article
February 1939

DISSOCIATED MONOCULAR NYSTAGMUS WITH PARESIS OF HORIZONTAL OCULAR MOVEMENTS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the laboratories and the neurologic service of the Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, and the Laboratory of Physiology of Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1939;21(2):266-272. doi:10.1001/archopht.1939.00860020070006
Abstract

The occurrence of the syndrome of monocular nystagmus and impairment of the horizontal conjugate gaze has been observed by Wilson,1 Radovici and Savulesco2 and Gaudissart.3 Gaudissart reported a series of 11 cases and considered that the syndrome was common in cases of multiple sclerosis. A review of 150 consecutive cases of disseminated sclerosis from the neurologic service of the Mount Sinai Hospital showed an incidence of 2 per cent, i. e., 3 cases. The syndrome is characterized by two features: (1) impairment of lateral conjugate gaze, which is unequal in the two eyes, with paralysis of the adductor and paresis of the abductor;4 and (2) monocular nystagmus in the abducted eye. This nystagmus is horizontal, slow and of large amplitude. For example, when the patient gazes to the right, the right eye is incompletely abducted and shows coarse nystagmus, while the left eye moves nasally, but

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