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Article
June 1939

REDUCTION OF POSTOPERATIVE COMPLICATIONS IN CATARACT OPERATIONS WITH CORNEOSCLERAL SUTURES

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Illinois Eye and Ear Infirmary.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1939;21(6):966-975. doi:10.1001/archopht.1939.00860060076003
Abstract

Ever since Williams,1 who is generally credited with being the first to advocate the use of conjunctival sutures in cataract extractions, published his paper on this subject in 1869 there have been many advocates of various types of sutures. Among the earliest of these one finds such well known names as H. Knapp,2 Kalt,3 Czermak,4 Vacher5 and Schweiger6 and, more recently, Verhoeff,7 O'Connor8 and many others. Excellent reviews of the literature on this subject were published by Wolfe and McLeod,9 Spratt,10 Ellett11 and others. Ellett favored Kalt's corneoscleral suture, although he mentioned that "the added wound, though small, introduces an added risk of irritation and infection."

Recently the popularity of suturing cataract wounds has increased rapidly, but there are still a good many operators who are content to leave conjunctival flaps unsutured. A surgeon is usually desirous of having

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