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Article
June 1939

SIGNIFICANCE OF FALSE PROJECTION IN TREATMENT OF SQUINT

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE
From the Wilmer Ophthalmological Institute of the Johns Hopkins University and Hospital.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1939;21(6):990-998. doi:10.1001/archopht.1939.00860060100006
Abstract

Although there are many articles in the literature on the nature and incidence of false projection, there has been little emphasis on its importance in the treatment of squint. Pugh1 made this general statement as to the possible effects of false projection :

If a patient's eyes are straightened by operation while he is still using false projection, he may after operation do one of the three things : (a) He may, finding the visual axes parallel, develop a true projection and fuse with his eyes straight. (b) He may pass through a transitional stage when he learns to readjust his projection so that he eventually adapts himself to the new position of the eyes. During this transition there is a false diplopia. . . . (c) He may show no sign of modifying his false projection, but retain it. Such a patient suffers from a troublesome false diplopia and in his efforts to

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