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Article
June 1939

CREATINE AND CREATININE OF THE OCULAR TISSUES

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Division of Ophthalmology, Department of Surgery, University of Chicago.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1939;21(6):1027-1030. doi:10.1001/archopht.1939.00860060137010
Abstract

Creatine and its anhydride, creatinine, are important substances which take part in the metabolism of tissue.1 In vertebrates creatine occurs in the tissue as creatine phosphate and free creatine, but in invertebrates the creatine is replaced by arginine. The question whether or not the precursor of creatine is arginine in vertebrates is unsettled, although creatine is related to arginine metabolically and structurally. Creatine is converted into creatinine by the tissue. The quantity of creatine in the tissue is relatively large as compared to that of creatinine. There seems to be no doubt that the formation and cleavage of creatine phosphate is a cyclic process which is concerned with the carbohydrate metabolism of active tissue. Apparently it is primarily associated with the coupling of dextrose to phosphate in the formation of dextrose phosphate as the first step in the glycolysis of dextrose. The dextrose phosphate is changed into a more

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