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Article
August 1939

EFFICIENCY OF VARIOUS WOUND CLOSURES IN PREVENTION OF PROLAPSE OF THE IRIS AFTER CATARACT OPERATIONS: EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

Author Affiliations

DULUTH, MINN.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1939;22(2):177-192. doi:10.1001/archopht.1939.00860080021002
Abstract

Methods of handling the limbic incision used in cataract operations have never been entirely satisfactory from the standpoint of prevention of postoperative gaping of the wound and herniation of the iris. Serious trouble is avoided in all but a small percentage of cases, but usually at the expense of the patient's comfort and well-being. In order to prevent these postoperative complications, the patient is commonly put on a scanty, constipating diet and immobilized more or less completely for upward of a week—a severe treatment for an elderly person. Various devices and methods of closure have been advocated, but despite these and despite enforced immobilization of the patient, gaping of the incision and prolapse of the iris continue to occur occasionally.

The crux of the matter seems to lie in the fact that during the process of healing the anterior chamber refills and intraocular tension returns before the wound is competent

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