[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 18.205.96.39. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
October 1939

EXPERIENCE WITH SULFANILAMIDE IN TREATMENT OF GONORRHEAL OPHTHALMIA

Author Affiliations

ANN ARBOR, MICH.
From the Department of Ophthalmology (Dr. Barbour) and the Department of Pediatrics (Dr. Towsley), University Hospital, University of Michigan.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1939;22(4):581-589. doi:10.1001/archopht.1939.00860100065005
Abstract

Recent advances in chemotherapy have interested many workers in treating a wide variety of diseases with the new drugs. None has received wider attention than sulfanilamide (paraaminobenzenesulfonamide). Following the reports of Long and Bliss1 that the drug was of value for the treatment of infections caused by streptococci, the work of Dees and Colston2 in first establishing its value in treating genital gonorrhea suggested that gonorrheal ophthalmia might also respond favorably.

Gonorrheal ophthalmia is most commonly seen in infants and comprises about 50 per cent of the cases of ophthalmia neonatorum. The introduction of the Credé method of prophylaxis reduced the incidence of the latter from approximately 10 per cent to well below 1 per cent.3 When this method is properly carried out, it is generally admitted that the actual incidence may be extremely low. In 1938 Skeel 4 reported 1 case of gonorrheal ophthalmia to every

×