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Article
October 1939

OPHTHALMOLOGIC ASPECT OF THE MODERN TREATMENT OF POSTENCEPHALITIC PARKINSONISM (THE BULGARIAN CURE)

Arch Ophthalmol. 1939;22(4):669-670. doi:10.1001/archopht.1939.00860100153013
Abstract

The purpose of this report is to call the attention of the American ophthalmologists to a new treatment for postencephalitic parkinsonism, one phase of which treatment is of definite ophthalmologic interest.

Since 1926 an herb collector by the name of Raeff in a Bulgarian village has been successful in treating patients with this disease with a secret medication. Queen Elena of Italy became interested in these cures and sponsored an institution in Rome for the scientific and clinical evaluation of the Bulgarian procedure. Remarkable work has been done by that institution under the leadership of Panegrossi. Later von Witzleben, in Germany,1 started work along the same line.

It has been established that "postencephalitic parkinsonism" is a misnomer and that the disease should better be renamed "chronic encephalitis." The Bulgarian treatment consists of the administration of a percolate of the root of the belladonna plant by mouth combined with gymnastic

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