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Article
November 1939

THE BETTS VISUAL SENSATION AND PERCEPTION TESTS: A METHOD OF DETECTING SCHOOL CHILDREN REQUIRING OCULAR ATTENTION

Arch Ophthalmol. 1939;22(5):832-843. doi:10.1001/archopht.1939.00860110118007
Abstract

The staff of the Research-Learning Project,1 which is concerned with studies of child development and school failure, found it necessary to make a subsidiary investigation of the methods of testing vision and of facts concerning the visual equipment of groups of children before proceeding with the main work of the project. This paper reports a study of a battery of tests purporting to indicate persons who need ocular attention.

Many records of teachers' tests with Snellen charts, as usually given in the schools, had been examined previously and were found to be insufficient and unreliable. Teachers themselves expressed dissatisfaction with the results. They admitted faulty procedures, such as inaccurate measurement of the 20 foot (6 meter) distance, poor lighting and the opportunity given the children for memorizing the charts. It is a patent fact that records made with Snellen charts under present testing conditions in most of the schools

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