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Article
November 1939

ACUTE ABSCESS OF THE LYMPH FOLLICLES OF THE CONJUNCTIVA

Author Affiliations

Grand Junction, Colo.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1939;22(5):882-885. doi:10.1001/archopht.1939.00860110172012
Abstract

Concerning pathologic involvement of the lymphoid tissue of the eye, there is still much unknown. One is more familiar with the normal anatomic picture.1 The lymphoid tissue is found in the superficial adenoid layer of the conjunctiva and is formed only in the third to the fourth month of life. It is thin, and the main formation is in the fornix. It consists of a fine connective tissue reticulum in the meshes of which the lymphocytes are embedded.

These lymphocytic aggregations consist, as everywhere in adenoid tissue, for example, the pharyngeal mucous membrane, of two types : simple diffuse gatherings of lymphocytes without special structure and, less frequently, collections of lymphocytes in the shape of nodules, called lymphatic nodules or (secondary) lymph follicles. These lymph follicles, if typically formed, consist of a lighter inner zone with large cells which take a lighter stain and an external darker zone consisting almost

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