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Article
February 1940

CYCLODIALYSIS WITH INSERTION OF A METAL IMPLANT IN THE TREATMENT OF GLAUCOMAA PRELIMINARY REPORT

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Department of Ophthalmology, Columbia University, and the Institute of Ophthalmology of the Presbyterian Hospital.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1940;23(2):270-300. doi:10.1001/archopht.1940.00860130308003
Abstract

Since Heine devised cyclodialysis (1905) the operation has been tried extensively by many surgeons. It has been called an internal fistulization in the belief that it creates a direct internal channel between the anterior chamber and the suprachoroidal space. Its action is opposed to external fistulization, in which the anterior chamber is made to communicate with the subconjunctival spaces outside of the eye by a trephine or a Lagrange operation.

Cyclodialysis is preferred by some surgeons because it is harmless and free from the dangers of secondary infection. Unfortunately its effects in relieving hypertension are almost always temporary. A permanent result is obtained in only about 20 per cent of the cases. The great number of failures has been ascribed to an earlier and complete cicatrization of the detached scleral insertion of the ciliary body to the scleral spur, which reattaches itself, blocking the aperture between the anterior chamber and

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