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Article
February 1940

CYCLOPLEGIA AND MYDRIASIS BY USE OF ATROPINE, SCOPOLAMINE AND HOMATROPINE-PAREDRINE

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Department of Surgery, Division of Ophthalmology, of the University of Chicago.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1940;23(2):340-350. doi:10.1001/archopht.1940.00860130378006
Abstract

This investigation was undertaken to determine for atropine sulfate, scopolamine hydrobromide and a combination of homatropine hydrobromide and paredrine1 the following points : (1) the length of time necessary for the induction of complete cycloplegia and mydriasis, (2) the time of occurrence and the amount of the minimum range of accommodation and maximum mydriasis, (3) the duration of maximum cycloplegia and mydriasis and (4) the length of time necessary after instillation of cycloplegia (a) for ability to do close work and (b) for return to the normal range of accommodation and normal pupillary diameter.

REVIEW OF LITERATURE  Innumerable drugs and combinations of drugs for the production of cycloplegia have been used in the past one hundred and twenty-eight years since William Wells2 in 1811 first described the effect of a medicine on the "power of the eye to adapt to near objects." Many times as a young man he

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