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Article
February 1940

MENINGIOMA OF THE SHEATH OF THE OPTIC NERVE: Report of a Case

Author Affiliations

Rochester, Minn.
From the Section of Neurologic Surgery (Dr. Love) and the Section of Ophthalmology (Dr. Rucker), the Mayo Clinic.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1940;23(2):377-380. doi:10.1001/archopht.1940.00860130415011
Abstract

A woman aged 48 came to the Mayo Clinic on June 13, 1938, complaining that the vision in her right eye had been slowly failing for two years. She had no other complaints. Physical and neurologic examinations yielded only negative results, except for the presence of a tremor in the head and both arms, with the cogwheel phenomenon, which was interpreted as being caused by a hereditary striatal disorder and not as being related to the presenting complaint.

Vision in the right eye was 6/20 and in the left 6/6. The reaction of the right pupil to light was slightly diminished ; the reaction of the left was prompt. Both pupils reacted normally on convergence. Ophthalmoscopic examination revealed a mild pallor of the right optic disk without loss of substance. The left fundus appeared to be normal. Perimetric fields showed a temporal contraction of the field for the right eye and

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