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Article
April 1940

IRITIS DUE TO BACTERIA AND BACTERIAL TOXINS ASSOCIATED WITH DENTAL SEPSIS: EXPERIMENTAL PRODUCTION IN LABORATORY ANIMALS BY ADMINISTRATION OF THESE TOXINS

Author Affiliations

BLOOMFIELD, N. J.
From the Department of Ophthalmology, St. Louis University School of Medicine.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1940;23(4):705-719. doi:10.1001/archopht.1940.00860130797003
Abstract

The relation between ocular diseases and oral sepsis has long been recognized. Articles1 on ocular diseases caused by dental infection have appeared in the dental literature as far back as 1839 and serve to establish the recognized clinical association between diseases of the mouth and diseases of the eye. The medical literature is replete with experimental investigations concerning the production of iritis by the administration of various bacterial agents obtained from multiple body foci, through various routes of administration. Most of the experimental workers hopefully allied themselves in their research with the attractive theory of Rosenow2 (1915), viz., that bacteria have a specific tendency to localize in certain tissues of the body, dependent on some peculiar inherent property, and based their studies on this concept. However, this present work is more especially concerned with the particular role of dental sepsis in the production of iritis experimentally.

The fact

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