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Article
April 1940

TUMOR OF THE THIRD VENTRICLE WITH RESULTING CHRONIC INTERNAL HYDROCEPHALUSCLINICAL HISTORY OVER A PERIOD OF SEVENTEEN YEARS

Arch Ophthalmol. 1940;23(4):727-734. doi:10.1001/archopht.1940.00860130819005
Abstract

Tumors of the third ventricle which cause chronic internal hydrocephalus are not uncommon, but the case here reported is interesting clinically because of the fact that the patient was followed for seventeen years and that death was due to a traumatic subdural hemorrhage.

The symptoms of a tumor of the third ventricle depend on the size and location of the growth and the involvement, either directly or through distant effects, of the important structures surrounding the ventricle. Weisenburg's1 paper published in 1910, in which he reported typical cases, gave a good summary of these symptoms, as they were caused either by direct pressure or after extension into the aqueduct of Sylvius by growth of the tumor ventrally. They were as follows : paralysis of associated ocular movements and of convergence upward and, less commonly, to either side or downward ; ataxia of the cerebellar type, as shown by the gait; stationary

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