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Article
May 1940

ROSACEA KERATITIS AND CONDITIONS WITH VASCULARIZATION OF CORNEA TREATED WITH RIBOFLAVIN

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND
From the Western Reserve University School of Medicine and the University Hospitals of Cleveland, Department of Surgery, Ophthalmologic Service.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1940;23(5):899-907. doi:10.1001/archopht.1940.00860131019001
Abstract

In a previous communication observations on the corneas of rats whose diet was deficient in riboflavin (vitamin B2) were recorded. At that time we said : "From our experience with the diet deficient in riboflavin, the most consistent ocular change was the appearance of corneal vascularization. . . . After riboflavin was added, the most uniform effect was remission of vascularization."1 While the article was in press, a similar opinion was expressed by Bessey and Wolbach :2 "Vascularization of the cornea is an early and constant phenomenon in albino rats in riboflavin deficiency. It precedes all other demonstrable lesions of the deficiency." Conspicuous cutaneous features are intense flushing of the skin and alopecia.

A chemical and pharmacologic description of riboflavin follows:

Riboflavin is the name which was proposed by the Council on Pharmacy and Chemistry of the American Medical Association3 for the compound 6,7-dimethyl-9(d,1'-ribityl)-isoalloxazin, which has the structure shown in figure

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