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Article
May 1940

ACUTE EXUDATIVE CHOROIDITIS: PATHOLOGIC PHYSIOLOGY: TREATMENT WITH VASODILATORS

Author Affiliations

UTICA, N. Y.
From the Herman Knapp Memorial Eye Hospital, New York.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1940;23(5):930-940. doi:10.1001/archopht.1940.00860131054005
Abstract

Acute exudative choroiditis, a not uncommon lesion of the fundus, has been considered to be a disease sui generis. The pathologic appearance of the healed lesion is well known, but reports of the pathologic appearance of the acute lesion are relatively uncommon.

There are no fundamental differences between the lesions of acute choroiditis and of chorioretinitis juxtapapillaris (Jensen's disease) other than that of location in the fundus. In the typical case of acute exudative choroiditis the lesion is surrounded on all sides by normal retina and choroid ; in the juxtapapillary type the lesion is adjacent to the disk, so that the edema surrounding the lesion involves part of the nerve head, giving the picture of partial optic neuritis. When the lesion in some of the cases of the juxtapapillary type has become quiescent, it is often seen that the choroidal lesion is not always directly adjacent to the disk but

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