[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 18.207.134.98. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
May 1940

PUPILLARY RESPONSE TO PHYSOSTIGMINE SALICYLATE IN ABSENCE OF OCULOMOTOR NERVE

Arch Ophthalmol. 1940;23(5):1090. doi:10.1001/archopht.1940.00860131218014

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

To the Editor:  —I was surprised on reading Spiegel and Scala's "Role of the Cervical Sympathetic Nerve in the Light Reflex of the Pupil" in the February issue of the Archives, page 371, to note that they were able to obtain contraction of the pupil of an eye deprived of its oculomotor nerve by instilling physostigmine salicylate (protocol, page 373).Although I have never had the opportunity to observe the action of this drug on the pupil of an eye deprived of its third nerve, both Duke-Elder (Text Book of Ophthalmology, London, Henry Kimpton, 1932, vol. 1, p. 545) and Berens (The Eye and Its Diseases, Philadelphia, W. B. Saunders Company, 1936, p. 949) state that it has no miotic action if oculomotor impulses are not effective. Their explanation is that physostigmine salicylate is not a stimulant in itself but activates the oculomotor end apparatus by inhibiting the destruction of

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×