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Article
July 1940

RECENT ADVANCES IN THE CARE OF THE INSENSITIVE CORNEA

Author Affiliations

TORONTO, CANADA

Arch Ophthalmol. 1940;24(1):182-186. doi:10.1001/archopht.1940.00870010204017
Abstract

The clinical diagnosis of lesions of the cornea reflects, in its involved terminology, the historical advances in medicine, and a review of the literature shows the chaos that has resulted from the use of descriptive, morphologic, anatomic, neurologic, mycotic and deficiency terms. Staining characteristics and the use of biomicroscopy have not simplified diagnosis nor aided the treatment, which, like diagnosis, is often a matter of individual preference. Duke-Elder's1 grouping (in his textbook of ophthalmology) of the herpetic, metaherpetic and neuropathic conditions on an etiologic rather than on a descriptive basis has been of aid.

It is with these conditions that the insensitive cornea is primarily associated, although one now sees in increasing numbers secondary corneal lesions as the result of surgical intervention for the relief of trigeminal neuralgia (tic douloureux).

Rose in 1890 was the first to remove the gasserian ganglion successfully after Horsley had tried to section the

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