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Article
July 1940

RELATION OF DRUSEN OF THE OPTIC NERVE TO TUBEROUS SCLEROSIS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Institute of Ophthalmology, Presbyterian Hospital, and the Department of Ophthalmology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1940;24(1):187-205. doi:10.1001/archopht.1940.00870010209018
Abstract

The present study was undertaken in an effort to establish a suspected relation between so-called drusen of the optic nerve and the disorder known as tuberous sclerosis. The occurrence in tuberous sclerosis of drusen-like lesions and the existence of certain similarities in the pathologic picture of the two conditions suggested that the same pathologic process might be responsible for both. Cases of drusen reported in the literature and all cases observed at the Institute of Ophthalmology in the past seven years have been analyzed, and the findings, together with a description of the more important manifestations of tuberous sclerosis, are reported.

DRUSEN OF THE OPTIC NERVE  Drusen, or hyaline bodies, of the optic disk have been described as resembling a conglomeration of frog eggs or tapioca grains or as having a papular surface like a mulberry (figs. 1 and 2). They also appear frequently as waxy, more or less translucent

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