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Article
July 1940

MALIGNANT MELANOMA—SO-CALLED SARCOMA—OF UVEA: III. EXTENSION INTO THE OPTIC NERVE

Arch Ophthalmol. 1940;24(1):206-214. doi:10.1001/archopht.1940.00870010228019
Abstract

Malignant melanoma does not involve the optic nerve frequently. Its relation to the optic nerve is of clinical importance, however, because the growth can extend along the nerve into the cranium. In a series of 94 cases of malignant melanoma the neoplasm had invaded the optic nerve in only 12 instances.1 Similarly, Byers and MacMillan2 from their own cases and from the literature found 40 instances of extension into the optic nerve in 392 cases. The relative infrequency of this complication (10 to 13 per cent) suggests that the optic nerve and the retina, especially the nerve fiber layer, are not "fertile soils" for the growth of the neoplasm. Yet it is commonly thought that melanomas of the skin and choroid frequently metastasize to the central nervous system. In discussing this point of view, Wortis and Wortis3 reported 6 cases of metastasis to the brain at the

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